¿Necesita ayuda rápida? Llamada 1-800-LEE-PLUG

Microhidráulica Industrial

Level Correlation

Fluid contamination can be described by a number of techniques:

  • The Gravimetric Method: The contaminant level is expressed as the mass of contaminant
    per unit volume of fluid.
  • Parts Per Million: The degree of contamination is based on mass or volume per million
    units (e.g. gms/106 gms).

The above techniques describe bulk or total contamination but give little information regarding size of contaminant. For example, unless the size and density of the contaminating particles is known, no conclusions may be drawn relative to numbers of particles.

Other techniques look at numbers of particles, describing contamination in terms of its size and concentration. These may be an interval concentration, for example the number of contaminant particles (per unit volume) between 5 and 15 µ in size. Additionally, contamination may be expressed as a cumulative concentration. In this case contamination levels are described by the total number of particles per unit volume above a given size. For example, the number of particles above 25 µ in size per 100 mL.

Most commonly used cleanliness specifications are based on numbers of particles rather than gravimetric techniques. However, particle distributions which were determined to be representative of service distributions (e.g. NAS 1638 distributions) correlate reasonably with those obtained gravimetrically with AC test dust. The table here (from An Encyclopedia of Fluid Contamination Control by E.C. Fitch) provides a correlation of some different cleanliness specifications.

Fluid contamination can be described by a number of techniques:

  • The Gravimetric Method: The contaminant level is expressed as the mass of contaminant
    per unit volume of fluid.
  • Parts Per Million: The degree of contamination is based on mass or volume per million
    units (e.g. gms/106 gms).

The above techniques describe bulk or total contamination but give little information regarding size of contaminant. For example, unless the size and density of the contaminating particles is known, no conclusions may be drawn relative to numbers of particles.

Other techniques look at numbers of particles, describing contamination in terms of its size and concentration. These may be an interval concentration, for example the number of contaminant particles (per unit volume) between 5 and 15 µ in size. Additionally, contamination may be expressed as a cumulative concentration. In this case contamination levels are described by the total number of particles per unit volume above a given size. For example, the number of particles above 25 µ in size per 100 mL.

Most commonly used cleanliness specifications are based on numbers of particles rather than gravimetric techniques. However, particle distributions which were determined to be representative of service distributions (e.g. NAS 1638 distributions) correlate reasonably with those obtained gravimetrically with AC test dust. The table here (from An Encyclopedia of Fluid Contamination Control by E.C. Fitch) provides a correlation of some different cleanliness specifications.