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Microhidráulica Industrial

Coefficient of Thermal Expansion

The Coefficient of Cubical Thermal Expansion is the change in volume per unit volume caused by a change in temperature of 1°F.

EXAMPLE:

MIL-H-83282 oil has a coefficient of cubical thermal expansion of 0.00046/°F. Thus a temperature rise of 100°F will increase its volume by 4.6%.

The bulk modulus and the coefficient of cubical thermal expansion can be used together to compute the pressure rise in a closed system subjected to an increasing temperature.

EXAMPLE:

MIL-H-83282 oil at 0 psi is heated from 70°F to 120°F in a closed, constant volume system containing 100 cu. in.

ΔP = 3.0    x    105   x    0.00046    x    50    =    6900 psi

This is the same ΔP which would be caused by adding 2.3 cubic inches of oil with no temperature change. It is also apparent that a constant system pressure could be maintained by bleeding off 2.3 cubic inches of oil while increasing the temperature by 50°F.

The Coefficient of Cubical Thermal Expansion is the change in volume per unit volume caused by a change in temperature of 1°F.

EXAMPLE:

MIL-H-83282 oil has a coefficient of cubical thermal expansion of 0.00046/°F. Thus a temperature rise of 100°F will increase its volume by 4.6%.

The bulk modulus and the coefficient of cubical thermal expansion can be used together to compute the pressure rise in a closed system subjected to an increasing temperature.

EXAMPLE:

MIL-H-83282 oil at 0 psi is heated from 70°F to 120°F in a closed, constant volume system containing 100 cu. in.

ΔP = 3.0    x    105   x    0.00046    x    50    =    6900 psi

This is the same ΔP which would be caused by adding 2.3 cubic inches of oil with no temperature change. It is also apparent that a constant system pressure could be maintained by bleeding off 2.3 cubic inches of oil while increasing the temperature by 50°F.